Elite Bodyweight Training
 
HomeHome  CalendarCalendar  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 dips vs push ups

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Buckman

avatar

Posts : 279
Join date : 2012-07-21
Age : 23
Location : Slovakia

PostSubject: dips vs push ups   Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:32 pm

are dips harder? all done with good form.

i have a very hard time with progressing in push ups but i can do a lot more dips every time (i do them like once a month lol)

current max 40 push ups, 30 dips
Back to top Go down
View user profile
OddBall



Posts : 33
Join date : 2012-03-27

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Sat Jan 26, 2013 2:22 pm

Different muscles. To me pushups are the easiest, followed by pullups and then dips.

I don't find dips the hardest, just the most awkward to do.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
1stratos1

avatar

Posts : 692
Join date : 2010-11-16
Age : 23
Location : Greece

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:18 pm

In my opinion there are similar muscles. In both primary muscles are chest/triceps and i guess shoulders too. But the difference is the angle, i mean one is vertial other horizontal. So it works mostly the same muscles from different angles. Well some small changes are that push ups maybe work ur core more cause of the plank position but dips work more ur shoulders/traps cause of the position.

Now i find dips harder cause u support ur whole weight with ur hands in comparison with push ups that ur feet support some of the weight too. So i think dips need some more strength BUT both exercises are beneficial for everyone.

_________________
Goals: Be able to do bar-barians requirements in less than 10 mins, 10 good form one hand push ups, 15 pistols, Be able to do one hand holds on bar and controlled negatives, 1 min hanging l-sit, backlever hold for 5+ secs, advanced tucked FL for 5+ secs, advanced tucked planche for 8+secs etc etc

Long Goal (till summer): My 1st OAC,good BL hold, FL hold, bent arm planche, free handstand push ups, l-sit to handstand on handles, v-sit hold on floor
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Fed X

avatar

Posts : 2139
Join date : 2011-07-14

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Sun Jan 27, 2013 2:53 pm

Push-ups vs. Parallel Bar Dips


Push-ups
As full-body, functional training exercises go, it's hard to beat the push-up. In a push-up, you place your body in a plank position, with feet together and hands directly below the shoulder with arms straight. You should be perfectly flat—like a plank—from the back of your head, down your back, across your hips, down your legs to your feet. Now, maintaining that flat posture, lower your chest to the floor by bending your elbows. Your chest should lightly touch the floor before you, well, push back up to your starting position.

All pretty familiar, right? Here are the strengths of the push-up:
1.Focuses on pecs and triceps: This exercise, like the bench press, which also involves a pressing motion directly forward from the chest, engages the complete pectoralis major. This is the big fan of muscle underneath your "breasts" that gives your chest its size and definition and is what you think of as your chest. A push-up also challenges your triceps.
2.Unlimited variation: You should think of the basic push-up as being sort of like a plate of spaghetti: there are a lot of sauces you can put on it. Variations include medicine balls and stability balls, plyometrics and inclines; but if you want to do chest isolations, just moving your hands is a great variation. Varying the width of the hands will focus the work on different parts of the pecs. The wider your hand placement, the more you isolate the outer portion of the chest. The narrower the placement, the more you work the sternal head (center of the chest near the sternum) of the pectoralis muscles. This narrow placement will also shift the intensity more towards your triceps.
3.Functional training: Beyond the chest work it provides, a push-up trains your entire body to function as a unit. That's because you have to use your abdominal muscles and back muscles to maintain your alignment as you push. Hence, it is a functional exercise. You won't get six-pack abs by doing push-ups. But the kind of full-body, real-world strength you develop from push-ups will help you in real-life strength tests—slipping in the shower, picking up a bag of groceries, tossing your little nephew in the air—in ways that a lifetime of isolated weight-lifting cannot.
The push-up is therefore a key exercise to any program that seeks not only big muscle, but functional strength for life activities. And, because of its endless versatility, it is possible to keep adapting the push-up to changing programs.

Parallel Bar Dips
Ever looked at a male gymnast's upper body? If so, you probably really envied his muscles. Some of that muscle is gained on the parallel bars. So why not steal a page from his book? Parallel bar dips involve standing between two parallel bars (typically a pair of longish handles on a stand) with one hand on each bar. You will take a step and press up so that you are above the bars with your upper body, arms straight to hold you up, with legs dangling between and below the bars. From here, you will bend your elbows to lower your body between the bars, coming down until your hands are near your chest with elbows bent behind you, then straightening your elbows to press back up and lift yourself back to the straight-armed start position.

Here are the benefits of the parallel bar dips:
1.Multiple upper body benefits: Dips primarily work the inferior pectoralis (lower aspects of the chest), which are largely missed by bench press and push-ups. They also target the triceps as well as the some of the anterior deltoids (front aspect of your shoulder). This exercise is also great for working the flexibility of your shoulder girdle.
2.Body angle important: This exercise depends on your body position, and can be manipulated to target different muscles. If, as you dip down, you incline your upper body forward, you will put more of the lift into your chest muscles. If, however, you remain vertical or upright as you dip down, you will target your triceps.
3.Functional with options: Parallel bar dips are, like push-ups, functional. That is because, like the push-up, they involve your ability to lift and move the weight of your own body, rather than an arbitrary added weight. Like the push-up, they offer the opportunity for training the body to function as a unit rather than simply bulking up individual muscles. Parallel bar dips can be made more difficult with the addition of a weight belt to which you can add however much additional weight you would like. This will give you the functional benefits of balancing your own weight—and engaging your core, abs and back to make your body act as a unit—while letting you add additional pounds as desired.
In the end, these are both great functional chest exercises with additional triceps work, and sooner or later both should form part of any comprehensive weight-training program. Remember that the chest dips will target the lower chest, providing definition, where the push-ups will target the upper and middle chest, providing thickness. Both have sufficient versatility, however, to bring new intensity to any program. .


dips are one of my favourites, better for max strength with added weight




I do dips in the corner area of my kitchen where the counters meet lol. Pushups are great for conditioning. Dips are more geared toward max strength.




I think that the power-tower is a very worthwhile investment regardless.

I think that push-ups can be modified to be a better triceps workout than dips. I think that the dips hit the chest much more than they do the triceps. Generally, with any pressing movement, the closer you move your hands together, the more you're going to put the emphasis of the movement on your triceps. Obviously, with your body in between your hands, there is only so close you can place your hands together with the dips.

Still, dips are a very functional, real-life movement. Try climbing over anything and you'll appreicate doing your dips. I think that they're a worthwhile exercise to do.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Fed X

avatar

Posts : 2139
Join date : 2011-07-14

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Sun Jan 27, 2013 2:53 pm

Benefits Of Doing Dips



Dips are better than Push-ups. Your whole body is moving & you can do them weighted more easily. Like Pull-ups & Chin-ups, Dips force you to lift your own body-weight. Stressing your upper-body & thus building muscle.

All strength training exercises have a technique to master. Dips are no different. Here's how to perform Dips with proper technique.


What are Dips? Raise yourself on 2 supports with elbows locked. Lower your body until your shoulders are lower than your elbows. Push yourself up by straightening your arms. Variations for Dips:
Parallel Bar Dips. Parallel bars that are 55cm/22" apart. My Squat Rack has 2 removable parallel bars I use for Dips.
Rings Dips. Dips using rings are harder than parallel bar Dips: you need to stabilize yourself more.
Chair Dips. Put 2 chairs back to back & dip in between. Make sure the chairs are stable enough so you don't fall.
Bench Dips. Feet elevated, hands on a bench. Avoid. The torso position is unhealthy for your shoulders, especially when you do them weighted.




Benefits of Dips. Push-ups have your feet planted. Dips move your whole body through space. Dips are harder and thus superior to Push-ups because you have to balance your body. Other benefits of Dips:
Build Strength. Dips build lockout strength: straightening your elbows. This helps the Bench Press & the Overhead Press.
Build Muscle. Dips will develop your triceps & chest muscles.
Rehab. Try Dips if you can't do the Bench Press because of a shoulder injury. Dips work similar muscles, do them if your shoulders can take it.


What If You Can't Do 1 Rep? Stay away from Dip Machines. The strength you build on machines doesn't transfer. Dips are harder: you have to balance yourself. If you can't do 1 rep, try one of these:
Ask for Help. Ask someone to help you on the way up by grabbing your side with his hands and squatting up & down.
Partials. Get on the 2 supports with locked elbows. Unlock your elbows, lower yourself slightly & push back up. Gradually increase the range of motion as you get stronger until you can break parallel.


Weighted Dips. Switch to Weighted Dips once you can do 10-15 reps with proper technique to keep the exercise challenging.
Dumbbell Between Legs. Hold a dumbbell between your feet while doing Dips. Doesn't work well with weights above 10-15kg.
Rucksack. Wear a rucksack & put plates in it. Make sure you use a strong rucksack so it doesn't break.
Belt + Chain. Wear a belt. Attach plates to a chain and to your belt. I recommend this method for Weighted Dips.
Dip Technique. You might not be able to lean forward & go as deep as James on the picture above. If your shoulders or sternum hurts, stay more upright with your chest up. But always apply the following rules on Dips.
Squeeze The Bar. Put your thumbs around the bar & squeeze it hard. The more force you apply to the bar, the stronger you are.
Look Forward. Don't look straight forward, don't look the floor. Look to a point slightly in front of you.
Breathing. Take a big breathe while hanging with locked elbows & hold it. Lower yourself & come back up. Breathe at the top, not during reps.
Chest Up. Don't let your shoulders roll forward. Keep your chest up & shoulders back. It's easier on your shoulders.
Bend Your Legs. And cross your feet. Letting your legs hang means less strength in my experience. Squeeze your glutes on the way up.
Break Parallel. Your shoulders must go lower than your elbows. Deeper stretches your chest more, but your shoulders might not agree with it.
Lock Elbows. Drive out of the bottom until your elbows are locked. Squeeze your triceps. No partial Dips.Common Problems. Break parallel on each rep just like with Squats. Use a complete range of motion from start to finish.
Not Hitting Parallel. Don't cheat by doing partial Dips. Your shoulders must go lower than your elbows on each rep.
Not Locking the Elbows. Lock your elbows at the top. Squeeze your triceps & keep your chest up.
Shoulder Issues. Don't go too low. Stop when you break parallel, keep your chest up & torso upright. Try shoulder dislocations.
Torso Pain. Don't let your shoulders roll forward & don't let your torso shift forward too much. Keep your chest up.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
mrpullup2

avatar

Posts : 83
Join date : 2012-05-22
Location : Chinning bar, Canada

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:03 am

I find that they work similar muscles, I mean, c'mon they are both pushing movements. The difference is that pushups are horizontal and dips are vertaicle. How difficult they are depends on each different person. I don't think one is any better than the other and I do think that you should do both. You may struggle with pushups now, but the more you do them, over time, them better you will become at them. But you have to do them to get good at them--strength is a skill, practice it often to get good, just like any other skill. Very Happy

_________________
-mrpullup2-
cheers
Back to top Go down
View user profile
OddBall



Posts : 33
Join date : 2012-03-27

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:39 am

mrpullup2 wrote:
I find that they work similar muscles, I mean, c'mon they are both pushing movements. The difference is that pushups are horizontal and dips are vertaicle. How difficult they are depends on each different person. I don't think one is any better than the other and I do think that you should do both. You may struggle with pushups now, but the more you do them, over time, them better you will become at them. But you have to do them to get good at them--strength is a skill, practice it often to get good, just like any other skill. Very Happy

It also depends on how you do them, =p. I guess they are similar muscles, yea. When I do parallel dips i'll do diamond pushups, and so forth. So when I say different muscles I had that in mind haha.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
BLKB



Posts : 33
Join date : 2012-07-07
Location : London

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:32 pm

beasty boy wrote:
Benefits Of Doing Dips


Dips are better than Push-ups. Your whole body is moving & you can do them weighted more easily. Like Pull-ups & Chin-ups, Dips force you to lift your own body-weight. Stressing your upper-body & thus building muscle.

This thread's one of the best I've ever read, cheers mate.

Dips are my nemesis... not much shoulder mobility and 260lbs to push. And trap issues so I need to be careful, they don't give warnings before they go. What's the best way to improve, partials or bench dips (or both?).

Thanks a lot, B.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
SIMBA

avatar

Posts : 94
Join date : 2012-07-18
Age : 21
Location : London

PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:57 pm

Quote :
What's the best way to improve
Alot of negatives alot
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: dips vs push ups   

Back to top Go down
 
dips vs push ups
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Oil Leak - clutch push rod (SOLVED)
» Push Button Ignition
» Push Carts
» Pitbull tires push back date
» Putting-Push or knock

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Welcome to the Bar-barians Forum :: General Discussions-
Jump to: