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 Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making

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Fed X

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PostSubject: Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making   Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:32 am

Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making







By Mike Mahler



Mistake #1: Not Keeping a Training Journal



Imagine running a business without keeping any records: you just keep working and hoping you're making more than you're spending. You've no way of knowing for sure if you're even making a profit and no way of knowing for sure if you're improving each month. Without proper accounting, a business is doomed; training is no different. When you keep a training journal you keep yourself accountable: you learn what works and what doesn't work; you learn how lack of sleep affects training and how the stress in your life affects training. An honest training journal allows you to avoid the illusion you're making progress when you're not making any progress at all. Don't just write down what you did at each workout--write down the other things going on in your life. If you had a great workout, think about what happened to result in a great workout that day. Did you sleep well the night before? What did you eat before the session? Were you in a good mood that day? Did you take a new pre-workout supplement? The more you know, the more you are likely to repeat the same feeling at another workout. On the other hand, if you had a terrible workout, think about the factors that may have contributed to it so you can avoid them in the future.



Another reason to keep a training journal is this: there's a natural human drive to want to improve. If you know what the number is, you'll want to beat it at the next workout. If you've no idea what you're doing at each workout, how will you know if you're moving forward or not?



You can't just rely on how you feel: you can feel great after a workout and think you're stronger, then look in your training journal and realize that you're weaker than your last workout--or that you've shown no improvement at all. Let's use the example of teaching training seminars to illustrate this point: let's say you made $2000 profit at a seminar in NYC, then generated $5000 revenue at another, second, seminar. On paper, it looks like the second seminar was more profitable; however, let's say the expenses that went along with the second seminar amounted to $3000. Thus, your profit is $2000 again, which means there was no improvement in profit between the seminars. If you didn't keep track of expenses you wouldn't know this valuable information; training is the same. Run your workouts like a business and you'll stay on track and increase your likelihood of making progress. How many of you are going to keep a journal as a result of reading this? I doubt more than 10%. Since a journal is easy to keep it is also easy to not do and most of you won't bother with it. Oh well, I did my part.



Mistake #2: Training for the Stimulus Rather Than for Results









Mike Mahler Bench Press 225lbs rep set




Go to any gym and you'll see trainees who've been doing the same workout for many years: they're doing the same exercises, the same weights, the same workout order--and enjoying the same lack of results. As the saying goes, expecting different results from the same actions is a form of insanity. Many trainees become process-oriented in which they just go through the motions at each workout. Now, don't get me wrong, going through the motions is better than doing nothing at all--unless you're doing Richard Simmons' "Sweating to the Oldies". Moreover, training for the stimulus isn't necessarily a bad thing: if the stimulus of training makes you feel better, then your time is never wasted completely at a workout; however, if you want to make progress, you have to be results-oriented rather than process-oriented, or, attached to the stimulus. Your discipline will be rewarded with progress in training rather than stagnation in training.



To use an analogy from business: you want to be focused on making money rather than acquiring praise. Of course, acquiring praise and feeling good about what you do are important--and nice-perks; however, if your business isn't making any money, then these perks don't really matter. Like it or not: money is a measurement that allows you to know if your business is improving or not improving. Getting more reps in a workout, using more weight, and getting more done in less time, are all forms of training progress measurement; use these tools, or, feel free to avoid making progress and keep wasting time in the gym or wherever you train.



In addition to being focused on the results, you want to be focused on the most efficient path to the result. If you can achieve a goal in three weeks with three workouts per week instead of six, why do six? Why do more, if you're not going to get improved results? Sure, the extra work is worth applying for an improved outcome, but not for the same outcome or, worse yet, an inferior outcome. If you just focus on being process-oriented when you run a business, you'll have the illusion you are improving but won't have the results for it; focus on achieving results and measuring your work and you'll have no doubt when you're moving forward.



Mistake #3: Lack of Focus







Mike Mahler Stack KB Pressing 106lbs (2 53lb bells) for reps after Las Vegas Course






Ever get excited about one thing, and then, two minutes later, forget about it and get excited about something else? Sure, all of us have at some point; regardless, to get good at something you have to put in some time. People who get bored easily are, most likely, people who fail often. Staying on course takes focus, discipline, and the ability to manage boredom; I think failing at everything is far more boring than getting good at a few things.



Now, when it comes to training programs, there are a lot of options and it can be difficult to pick just one; however, it's critical you do exactly that and stick with just one program for at least three weeks. Do make sure you've a clear idea of what the program you've picked entails: if you're going to start a high-volume training regimen, make sure you do it at a time in your life when you're eating and sleeping well and able to take time to train consistently. If you have a lot of stress in your life, and an erratic schedule, pick a program more appropriate for your situation. Once you get started, stick with the program for a while: pick one goal, accomplish it and then move on. You should know exactly what you're going to do at 90% of your workouts--and what the end result will be. Going to a job and punching in hours might work for nine-to-fivers, but won't work for training. Don't start a workout without knowing what you're trying to accomplish; don't start a set without knowing how many reps you are going for.



Remember, lack of focus and lack of discipline will equal lack of results. Imagine opening a bike shop and then closing it the next day and deciding to sell lampshades instead; then, a week later, deciding you want to be a personal trainer. Chances are high you'll fail at everything you try, if you don't have the focus and discipline to finish what you start. If you change your mind every two minutes in business, you'll inevitably go under; training isn't any different. Know the target and go after it until it is achieved; then, switch gears. Remember, it's easy to start a project and much harder to finish. "I shall finish the game,"--great advice from Billy the Kid in the movie Young Guns.



Mistake #4: Assuming training has to be complicated to be effective



Strength training is not rocket science: your program doesn't have to involve what's the equivalent of a calculus equation to be effective. In fact, the more complicated a program is, the more likely it is to fail. Especially when you're a novice to strength training; it's always amusing to see men with twelve-inch guns doing twelve sets of bicep curls, ten sets of dumbbell flys--and no leg work. Hmm, I wonder whey they look like crap and never make progress...



Develop a strong foundation in the basics and focus on exercises that'll give you the most bang for your buck. Forget about tons of exercises for your arms when you can only bench press 185 and squat 155. Forget about bicep specialization programs when you can't even do a pull-up. I often get emails from trainees who are beginners training six days per week in which they designate one day for each body part. Such programs may be fine for experienced trainees who've a solid foundation; however, for beginners, it's far from the best path. Full body workouts, with a focus on compound exercises such as Deadlifts, Barbell Squats, Bench Presses, Military Presses, Bent-over Rows, and Pull-ups are a great place to start. Get your bench press up to 300lbs, Military Press up to 200lbs and Deadlift up to 400lbs before you think about complicated routines.



Mistake #5: Training with maximum intensity too often



No doubt, productive weight training takes lots of hard work; regardless--with the exception of money and sex--too much of anything isn't always the most productive path: too-frequent training with maximum intensity will fry your central nervous system. Once this happens, you'll become sluggish mentally and your physical body will follow accordingly. In other words: everything will feel heavy in the gym and your body will feel out of sync. The harder you train, the less frequently you can train; however, training infrequently isn't ideal either. Training is a skill, and, like playing the piano or learning a new language, it has to be practiced often. The more you do something without burning out the better you'll get and the more efficient you'll become. If you're on a program wherein you do the Military Press once every two weeks and aren't doing any other exercises similar to the Military Press between each session, each time you execute the Military Press it'll feel like you're doing it for the first time. Take some advice from top strength coach Pavel Tsatsouline, and treat the majority of your workouts as practices. Every so often--such as every 10-14 days--do a maximum effort to see how you're progressing and to keep you excited about training.



Mistake #6: Not spending enough time on restoration



No training program will be effective without adequate restoration: we live in a sleep-deprived culture wherein our adrenals are working over time and thus, we hold the illusion we can get by with four hours of sleep and a high-stress lifestyle--as long as the adrenals are working overtime, we feel as if we're top of things. Unfortunately, the adrenals will eventually shut down and then you're in big trouble: you'll hit the wall like a Mack truck and feel terrible. Get ready for depression, no energy nor any desire to get out of bed. The more stress you have in your life the more rest you need. Yes, you need eight hours of deep sleep every night; yes, you need to take some days off from training and relax. Do yourself a favor and get a sports massage every two weeks--can't afford it? Get rid of your TV and cable bills and free up that cash for restoration options. Take a twenty-minute nap after workouts and learn how to handle stress. Meditate and/or take walks daily to clear your head.


















This is geared mainly towards weight lifters but it can be applied to BW Training as well
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PostSubject: Re: Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making   Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:31 pm

I didn't read it all just pieces. Good points anyway.

Usually articles with that kind of title are usual bullshit, but this was very good and Honest.

Cheers Beasty

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PostSubject: Re: Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making   Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:37 pm

Yeah, I was surprised by that too...

The last one is the one i'm most guilty of... way too little sleep

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PostSubject: Re: Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making   Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:09 pm

I'm guilty of #2, I think I tend to get to stagnation, I don't like going out of my workout plan and I never try new exercises really :/

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PostSubject: Re: Six Common Training Mistakes You're Probably Making   Fri Jan 04, 2013 6:15 pm

Mike Mahler is a legend and extremely credible... all of his articles are always on point & packed with good advice... sign up for his emails and you wont be disappointed
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