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 Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal

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Heskey

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PostSubject: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:55 pm

Hi guys, have followed many of your posts for inspiration and new ideas but have never posted till now.

The aim of my workouts is as the title says to get to 5 sets of 5 reps with 50 seconds rest in between each set with 40kg (88lbs) dangling from my waist doing pull ups. I have had read into Pavel's logic, had a go at simple straight sets, density training and different pyramid styles and i when possible avoid hitting failure.
However i am currently doing pyramids sets and pulling out 4,3,2,2,1 with the 40kg so i have achieved the weight i wanted i just want to keep increasing the reps! Which is a struggle at the minute. So i am shouting out to you guys! The pull up gurus! for advice. From some of the posts i have read some of you could probably pull out my goal in your sleep! so any advice, routines of how you have achieved similar or how you would approach my challange any input would be a big help!

Also:
My rests are a lot longer at the minute but my main focus before timing is getting to the full 5x5!
Im usually on the pull ups 3-4 times a week always sticking to the same weight just playing with the reps trying to keep them increasing. My max reps so far is 4 reps and thats just shy of failure.
I treat it as if my muscles have to learn that this is my real weight so my body thinks its lifting an 18 stone man not a 12 stone man!

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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:05 am

Developing Your Pull-up Ability, Part 1


Simon Forsyth

September 18, 2008 12:15 PM

As some people know, I have always done pull-ups, I have always enjoyed them, and I don't see enough people doing pull-ups in the gym. I have also been asked many questions about pull-ups and I have also given my two cents regarding pull-ups.

So now I am going to write a quick post (which turned into this article) about pull-ups, the best way to perform them (in my opinion this technique is the best way to perform them because you will not only develop very good pull-up form but this technique will make you so much stronger in pull-ups, meaning you will be able to do more reps or add weight quicker, your back with even pack on muscle easier by increasing the size of you High Threshold Motor Units). I will quickly explain the various tips I have picked up along the way and how to train your pull-ups to reach your goals quicker (now that's real performance).

Now what is a pull-up? Well it's not as dumb a question as you might think. Many people think a pull-up is a where you grab the bar and pull yourself up to the bar. Well a pull-up in an overhand grip (with thumbs around the bar) a tactical pull-up is an overhand grip using only the fingers (a.k.a a thumb less grip). Now some people think a chin-up is a pull-up but it isn't a chin up is an underhand grip with or without thumbs. The other grips I will quickly mention are the towel grip and the v-grip. Towel grip pull-ups are where you drape two towels over a pull-up bar grip onto the really tightly and perform your pull-ups. A v-grip is where you get a v-grip from some type of pulley machine and put that over the bar so you're using a neutral grip and pull your self up to the bar (you will develop the back more if you pull your sternum up to the bar.

Now that we have that part covered I want to talk about where you must pull your body up to. Eye level isn't going to cut it. If your doing chin-ups and pull-ups you need to bring your head over the bar (as Pavel has spoken about, and I am pretty sure its the rule with the Tactical Strength Challenge, make your neck touch the bar that way there can be no arguing if you got that rep or not - this can also be a good way to measure your performance because if you are aiming for 20 reps but only 15 of those reps are where the neck touches the bar you know you will need to aim for more where your neck actually touches the bar). Another way to do pull-ups that requires more strength is the sternum pull-up in which you will have to make your sternum touch the bar in the top position (this will also build your middle back thickness).

Now I have seen a lot of people mention kip/kipping pull-ups. I am not fond of these because I have always seen these as cheating. I note that they can be useful but I feel it detracts from the strength building, having said that I see the kipping pull-up as having more real world applications but if you can do 10 strict tactical pull-ups with 24kgs attached to your body and you find yourself needing to climb through a window I am sure you would be able to kip your self up if need be. For the purpose of strength development and pull-up prowess I would advise to stay away from kip pull-ups but if you want to throw them in do so on an easy day or for your last couple of reps on a really hard day (make a note that you kipped your way up and try and do it better next time).

Since I have spoken about the kipping pull-up I will talk about what I deem to be the ultimate pull-up technique, this technique will help you build up your High Threshold Motor units, not only that but once you get the technique down pat you will improve your pull-ups a lot quicker and it can be used for any type of pull-up or chin-up. So here is the technique:
•Grab hold of the pull-up bar and make sure your in a dead hang position so your not using any momentum

•Explosively pull your self up, try and do this as quickly as possible (remember don't kip, you may not go flying up but you have to try because your fast twitch muscle fiber's will work better).

•Once your at the top position flex all your pulling muscles and control the decent for the first 3/4 of the negative portion of the (you can actively push yourself away from the bar).

•For the last 1/4 of the negative you need to get yourself into a dead hang (aim to get a slight stretch).

•Once you have achieved the stretch explode back up as you did in step one and repeat all the steps.

Set/Reps to improve your pull-up greatness:

Well, looking at it in a simple way, they there are heaps of methods that develop your ability to do pull-ups, the way I look at it is as follows:

If your aiming to increase the amount of weight you can use in your pull-ups you may find that treating your weighted pull-ups as a power drill will work very well (like you might train your deadlift with straight sets and various percentages of your 1RM), for example you might train three days a week doing 60%, 80% and 100% on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Do bodyweight ladders trying to add more 'rungs' (reps) to your ladder, because when you are going to be tested in pull-ups you need to be able to do high reps so provided you don't go to all out failure your body will become accustomed to the higher reps. Also feel free to use the GTG method, increasing the reps. I found that for GTG to be really effective you focus on a percentage of your rep max, test it at the beginning of the week and adjust your reps and time between each set everyday (if your doing higher reps sets feel free to increase the rest between sets that day) - this is highly effective and you can find a method similar to this in Pavel's push-up article "Hit the Deck" which is in Beyond Bodybuilding.

If you want to increase your strength in weighted pull-up's, I honestly believe using a 5RM with what I have always called 'power ladders' (I believe that they are known here as pre set ladders - I called them power ladders before Beyond Bodybuilding came out, so that is what I will call them) you do the following: 1 rep, rest a minute. 2 reps, rest a minute then rest a minute, rest a minute and start over. Now repeat the series until you have done 30, rest a day and repeat the next day but add another ladder until you doing a total of 50 reps (as I have stated before, once that anything over 50 reps is a waste of time if you want to get stronger). Now you can feel free to stay at 50 reps and decrease the rest periods if you choose (building up the density will cause more strength and muscle), or you could chose to do 40 reps but always change the variables.

The thing is that these methods are popular because they work and best of all they are simple.

You might even choose to alter all the variables with your power ladder and you might say that you will do 40 reps one week and do it three times a week so you might use a higher reps and a lighter weight and the next week you might decide to do 30 reps which would mean that you would use a heavier weight... just something for you to think about.

Also if you really want to develop your pull-ups you need to work both weighted and bodyweight pull-ups. Also I feel (but can't prove) that you should also vary your grip but still focus on the tactical pull-up style.

One last thing I would like to add is body position regarding the load you're using. I have always done my pull-ups with my knees bent so my legs are behind me and I usually cross my legs over. I also do them with a straight body. Now when you start to use a weight close to 100% of your body weight you will have to change your body position and this is OK. You may find that you may have to move your legs so they are bent forwards (for a better idea of what I am talking about view John Allstadt's article in the article section).

There are many ways to skin a cat; you don't have to do straight sets either as you can decide to alternate your pull-ups/chin-up with some form of pressing, this method is how I train and I find it really helps to relax your puling muscles.

Anyway, that's just a little food for thought. I know this will help you regardless of what your pull-up goal is. If you can't do a single pull-up just wait until the second part of this article comes out. In the second part of this article I will provide a great method that will have you doing pull-ups in no time and I can guarantee that it isn't the common advice most people give out so stay tuned.
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PostSubject: Id apply this same logic to doing Pull Ups   Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:06 am


Tackling the Weighted Chin-up

By
Ben Bruno
Published: November 18, 2010Posted in: TrainingTags: Ben Bruno, chin up, pull-up, spud, training


This article is for those who have become proficient with chin-ups and pull-ups and want to progress into heavier weighted pulls.
Back in March 2009, I had knee surgery that forced me to stop hard, lower body training for a little while. I still wanted to train hard, but I was limited in what I could do. This is when I decided to really focus on pull-ups. I had always included pull-ups in my program, but up until that point, they had always been more of an afterthought that I would slap on at the end of my workouts. I contacted Harry Selkow at EliteFTS and got started on his plan. It worked great for awhile until I hurt my shoulder in an ostensibly random event outside the gym. It hurt any time I lifted my arm over my head, so I was forced to stop doing pull-ups for awhile to let it heal. In hindsight, that injury was a blessing in disguise because it forced me to reevaluate my training and get smarter. Up until that point, I had never been good about listening to my body and frequently tried to push through injuries. As anyone who trains hard knows, this works sometimes, but it eventually catches up to you.


I stopped doing pull-ups completely for two months and used that time to get my shoulder healthy and come up with a new plan. In that time, I worked on horizontal rowing, band pull-aparts, and face-pulls and scarecrows with blast straps. When I resumed my pull-ups program, I first switched to chin-ups (underhand grip), which didn’t irritate my shoulder nearly as much. I was surprised to find that I was actually stronger, despite not having done the exercise for awhile. This really surprised me. Within a month of returning, I hit my goal of five reps with 100 pounds added, which I had proclaimed when I first contacted Harry.
At this point, I set a new goal—to do a chin-up with twice my body weight (175 pounds) for reps with three plates added. I knew that to achieve this goal I had to come up with a solid program that focused on progressive resistance and, more importantly, kept me healthy. With most lifts, I have taken a very simple approach. I keep a log book, and every time I repeat an exercise, I try to add weight and/or reps. If I fall within the rep range I’m shooting for, I add weight the next time. If I fall short on the reps, I keep the weight the same and increase the reps. Boring, yes. Simple, yes. Effective, yes.
However, I quickly found that when I got to a certain point on chin-ups, I hit a plateau pretty damn fast. Constantly doing heavy weighted chin-ups was taking a toll on my shoulder as well. I needed a new plan. Harry Selkow taught me an extremely important lesson—you don’t have to go to failure all the time. Before that, I gave myself a predetermined number of chin-ups to do, and I did every single set to failure until I hit that number. This was an extremely important lesson for me to learn. Moreover, from my two-month hiatus from chin-ups, I learned that I didn’t have to focus exclusively on heavy chin-ups in order to improve my chin-ups. These two lessons provided the basis for my plan.
I want to be clear that this plan is just a template. I frequently made small changes based on how I was feeling, availability of equipment (I lifted in a packed school gym), and other things. I encourage you to do the same. There is certainly value in following a plan, but first and foremost, you have to listen to your body and adapt to your surroundings. Anyone who is worried about weighted chin-ups likely has been around the block enough to know this, but it’s worth stating anyway. With that said, here is the basic outline I followed to increase my weighted chin-ups. This program worked for me, and in one year, I was able to go from 100 X 5 to 132 X 5 and achieve a twice my body weight chin-up.
1. Drop pull-ups entirely in favor of chin-ups, neutral grip chin-ups (palms facing), and blast straps chin-ups. These three exercises became my staples for both weighted and non-weighted pulls. I know some people say that chin-ups are easier so it’s cheating and yada yada yada. For awhile, I used that as a reason to do pull-ups. They constantly hurt my shoulder though, so in the end it wasn’t worth it. My point here isn’t to bash pull-ups at all. If you can do them pain free, great. My point is just to listen to your body and don’t subscribe to dogma that you have to do certain lifts at all costs.
2. Switch from training the back twice every week to once every 5–6 days. I found that for me hitting the back muscles twice each week was actually slowing my progress down rather than speeding it up. It was causing some pretty substantial elbow pain. When I dropped the frequency slightly, my strength actually went up quickly. I still hit the muscles more frequently than a standard one body part a week split, but this slight change made a big difference in my recovery.

3. Only focus on chin-ups two out of every three back workouts. This means that every third back workout I dropped chin-ups and focused the workout solely around horizontal rowing variations. This gave my shoulders a break while still strengthening my lats. I guess you could consider the third workout to be a chin-up deload of sorts.

4. On chin-up focused workouts, alternate between weighted and non-weighted pulls. I personally find that heavy weighted chin-ups tear up my shoulders and elbows if done with a high frequency, and I have spoken with many others who have had similar experiences. To combat this, I rotated in body weight chin-ups to give my joints a break while still working my muscles. On weighted days, I did them first in my workout while I was fresh. On body weight days, I did them near the end of my workout when I was fatigued.
On weighted chin-up days, I followed a very simple progressive plan. I started at a 10RM and simply added 2.5–10 pounds each time I repeated the exercise, depending on how I was feeling. Usually, the jumps were small, but there were times I was feeling frisky and added more. The reps inevitably dropped some as the weights increased but not very quickly. Once I got down to four reps, I reset my numbers back to a 10RM (albeit higher than the previous 10RM) and started the process over again. This system worked very well, and I really didn’t stall. You have to remember though that I was only doing weighted chin-ups once every three back workouts, so I had plenty of time between each workout—usually a little over two weeks. Had I tried to do weighted chin-ups every workout, this plan would have stalled very quickly. It may seem crazy to only do weighted chin-ups once every 15 days or so, but I promise you won’t get weaker.
On non-weighted days, I stuck to my old plan of picking a predetermined number and trying to reach it in as few sets as possible. I actually kept this number at 100 reps for the whole time and just tried to get there in fewer sets. Depending on your current level, I recommend that you adjust the number to something that will take you 7–8 sets to start (this number will come down as you improve). However, the difference was that this time I rarely took the sets to failure.
On occasion, I overestimated myself and failed to complete a rep, but for the most part, I always left a rep or two in the tank. In the past, taking every set to failure, my numbers would drop off dramatically after the first set and it would take more sets to reach 100. Leaving reps in the tank actually allowed me to get to 100 faster. It may seem counterintuitive, but it works. Also, I spaced these sets throughout my workout, so I had very long rest periods. If you try for sets of max reps with short rest, the reps will fall off very fast.
On days when I wasn’t feeling up to par, I used the body weight days to give my body a break and do 10 sets of five reps in between other exercises. These workouts were very easy, so it gave me a break while still getting some lat work in. I should also note that I did each rep, both weighted and unweighted, with a full range of motion to full extension getting my chin over the bar. I’m not going to get into an argument about the efficacy of kipping pull-ups; I’m just stating what I did.
So here’s what it would look like:
Workout 1: Weighted chin-ups (changing grips frequently) (5–6 days later)
Workout 2: Body weight chin-ups (5–6 days later)
Workout 3: Rows (5–6 days later)
Weighted chin-ups again (and so on and so forth)
Push the rows hard. But isn’t this supposed to be about chin-ups? Yes, but I found that as my rowing improved, so did my chin-ups. I kept a log book and constantly tried to increase my numbers. Like with chin-ups, I found several rowing variations that worked well for me. For me, this meant rows with a neutral grip, as these caused no pain in my shoulder. I spent time experimenting with many variations and settled on four in particular.
1. Inverted rows with blast straps: This was a great exercise with minimal lower back stress. Using blast straps was nice because I rotated my hands and allowed my shoulder to move through a natural range of motion. I also started doing these with one arm to increase the difficulty. This has actually become one of my favorite exercises.
2. Trap bar Pendlay rows: This is basically a barbell row (only using the trap bar) where you reset the weight for each rep.
3. Old school T-bar rows: This is where you put the bar in a corner and use a V-grip handle to row between your legs.
4. “Kroc” dumbbell rows: Anyone reading this undoubtedly knows what these are. I didn’t do them often because the dumbbells in my gym didn’t go up high enough, but I used them whenever I visited a different gym.
On “rowing” days, I picked two of these variations and did about four sets of each, unless I chose Kroc rows, in which case I did 1–2 work sets. I started with a weight I could get about 12–15 reps with and added weight each set going up to a top set of 6–8 reps. Each set was pushed hard, though not to complete failure. I usually stuck with each row variation for 3–4 workouts in a row before switching to another variation. However, this was just a template. I was lifting in a very busy gym, and if the equipment was being used, I did a different row—no big deal. The important thing was that every single time I did an exercise, I referred back to the last time I did that exercise in my log book and tried to beat the previous performance. It’s all about progression.
Include weighted hangs at the end of each back workout. I actually got this idea from Dante Trudel, the creator of Doggcrapp training. His protocol is aimed at fascial stretching where the trainee uses straps and hangs from the bar with heavy weight hanging from a dip belt. I employed a similar strategy but with different goals. My goal with these hangs was to let my body adjust to the feeling of hanging with heavy weight added and improve my grip strength. Thus, I didn’t use lifting straps for these hangs. I simply hung for 30 seconds with as heavy a weight as I could and increased the weight as time went on. When it came time to test a double body weight chin-up, my body was used to hanging with heavy weight, so it didn’t come as a huge shock to the system.
As a side benefit, these weighted hangs feel great for spinal decompression after a hard workout. Start light on these and let your body adapt before adding a ton of weight. The goal isn’t to rip your arms off. You can use any grip you’d like, though I personally think a neutral grip is best.
General points
1. Stay lean. If you aren’t lean already, get lean. Extra fat will only hurt you in the quest to get better at weighted chin-ups. You can’t count those love handles and beer gut as added weight.
2. Be consistent. Inconsistency is the number one thing that I see holding most people back who aren’t where they want to be.
3. Know when to deload or take a week off. We all love to train, so it can be hard to lay off the throttle. I struggle with this myself. But time and time again, I come back stronger when I do it. The template I’ve outlined is meant to be worked into your current training program (of course it will take the place of the current lat and back work). Take your regularly scheduled deloads and off weeks as normal. Resume this program when you resume your other training. I recommend a week off every 6–8 weeks. Listen to your body though and do what you need to do.
4. Buy some blast straps, TRX, or rings. I prefer blast straps because they’re a little more heavy duty and will hold substantial loads, but anything will work fine.
Getting blast straps has been one of the best investments I’ve made, and they are a great tool for improving chin-ups. They are great for accessory exercises like face pulls, scarecrows, and inverted rows, but they are great for chin-ups as well. At first, your numbers might go down a little bit as you adjust to the instability. But once you get used to them, it’s great. They allow your shoulder to move through a natural range of motion. In fact, when I first tested the double body weight chin-up, I used the blast straps to do it.
Also, invest in a comfortable dip belt like the one from Spud. You will thank me for this. Those old leather belts will just tear your hips up if you do heavy chin-ups frequently. Plus, the bright yellow color will draw attention as you show off your newfound chin-up strength.
I hope this provides you with some direction for progressing on weighted chin-ups. This is what has worked for me, and I think it can work for you. Try it out and see for yourself. Best of luck and have fun!


























Id apply this same logic to doing Pull Ups

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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:12 am

1 of my pull up Routines Strength/Power Today at 8:02 am












Workout: Pull ups
set1. 45lbs. 10 reps 2 min rest
set2. 135lbs. 1 rep 1 min rest
set3. 135lbs. 1 rep 2 min rest
set4. 45lbs. 10 reps 2min rest
set5. 135lbs. 1 rep. 1 min rest
set6. 135lbs. 1 reps 2 min rest
set7. 45lbs. 10 reps 2 min rest
set8. 135lbs. 1 rep 1 min rest
set9. 135lbs. 1 rep 2 min rest
set10. 45lbs. 10 reps 2 min rest
set11. 45lbs. 10 reps Done
The switch from 135lbs. to 45lbs. makes the 45lbs. feel lighter the more you lift 135lbs. the lighter and lighter the 45lbs. feels.Try it out.

You can always pick 2 different weights to suit your strength heavier or lighter.


























this routine is from forum member IronLoo, and, Ill actually prob start doing this tomorrow along with the other routines I posted above
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:00 pm

Cheers for those articles Ice Berg Slim the second one caught my attention and deffinetely sounds like something worth trying to get me to my goal! Also nice workout sounds like those 45lbs reps would really burn! I plan to mix it up a bit and start playing with the weight more once iv reached 5x5!

thanks again!
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:07 pm

my bad just noticed that the workout was IronLoo's! lol. Good luck in surviving that workout!
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:47 pm

Heskey, haha yea that's my routine, just pick 2 weights to suit you and keep adding weight to the light sets and the heavy set as it becomes easy one day.


Here are few more great routines again pick a weight suitable for you!



1#(Strength)Another good workout before you do pull ups is pick a weight maybe 10lbs. heavier than your 1rep max , a weight you can't pull real heavy maybe your body-weight add that get on a stool to help yourself to the top of the pull up hold the top static position as long as you can and make sure to slowly lower when tired don't drop! Do 3 sets with 5min. rest, i am sore from only 1 set of this yesterday it builds the whole back completely.Will make half the weight feel like a feather try it out.

2# (strength/endurance) I did this routine in some of my vids. Pick a weight i use 45lbs. do 10 reps immediately take the weight off zero rest and do another 10reps, take a few mins. rest and keep going till you can't maintain 45lbs.10reps+10 reps no weight 10+10 is the minimum shoot for 5 -10 sets in this fashion once easy increase the weight.I use this same concept with dips same weight but double the reps 20+20.

3# (Extreme Endurance)10 sets max out pull ups with :30 second rest go till you can't go 1 rep still counts if you can't do one rep do static holds, if you can't do a static hold use a bench to get to the top to keep going.


4#(Power) Pick a weight and a total number i do this at the end of a huge session i use 45 lbs. you pick either 25,50,75, or 100 reps i usually pick 75 sometimes 100.

Max out a few mins. rest till you get to 100 no matter what.

These will all help and you can use these methods for other basics like, dips, push ups.Hope this helps some Goodluck.
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:06 pm

Heskey wrote:
my bad just noticed that the workout was IronLoo's! lol. Good luck in surviving that workout!




its pretty nice
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:42 pm

Ice Berg Slim Glad you gave it a shot.W hat weights did you alternate with and how do you feel?
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:47 pm

45LB & 115LB were my alts, and, it was INSANE!!! Very challenging. Really awesome routine bro!!! Thanks... My belt is WAY TOO crappy, so, I Will prob go ahead and buy the IronMinds belt so that I can be unrestricted when adding weight



Dip Stand Angled Dipping Station HD Machine $100 at amazon.com
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Sat Jan 14, 2012 11:34 pm

Ice Berg Slim glad to hear you liked the routine, and that dip stand looks similar to mine great price.
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Sun Jan 15, 2012 12:20 am

Im convinced now... I do not care for Power Towers... If you can find one with GOOD PullUp/Dip bars then maybe, but, pretty much every tower that Ive ever used the pull up/dip bars seem to never be ergonomically correct and always feel very RESTRICTED and have limited space or are to unstable and wobbly. The push ups handles are usually the only ones that feel right.. my old TSA Tower was really nice, but, the pull up bar wasnt a straight bar, it had some weird crappy alt design. Id Rather have seperate stations
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PostSubject: Re: Weighted Pull Ups My 5x5 Goal   Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:02 pm

When To Start Weighted Pullups
By extremepullups On November 17, 2010 · 24 Comments ....Once you start adding pullups into your regular workout routines, you should start to see an increase in your max set of pullups fairly quickly. At some point you will probably reach a plateau, or a wall, and that is the time to add weighted pullups to your routine. Now there is really no right time to switch over to weighted pullups, but a good number of bodyweight pullups you should be doing is 10 or more. Once you feel like your progress is slowing, changing to weighted pullups might be exactly what you need to boost your gains.So now the question is what is a weighted pullup? Well its simple: A bodyweight pullup in which you add more weight, as in weight plates or a dumb bell. The weight you can add can range from 5lbs to 200lbs+, that’s up to you, just remember to start small and then increase steadily as you progress. A weighted pullup is performed exactly the same way as you would perform a standard pullup.

The next question is how do I incorporate weighted pullups into my routine? You want to do weighted pullups at least once a week, maybe 2-3 times as you become more experienced. If you have a weightlifting routine then the best day to add weighted pullups, would be the day you work your back. If you are doing bodyweight workouts then add weighted pullups into a workout day, that way you are not doing bodyweight pullups the day before.



So what is better: More reps with less weight or less reps with more weight? Well there are benefits to both. Using more weight will build strength, using less weight will allow you to do more reps which will add to your stamina and endurance. I like to do both. Some sets go heavy, throw some heavy weight on there, and knock out a couple reps. Then for other sets throw a smaller plate on the chain and do max reps with it. There is no wrong way to do them and each workout will help you improve in some way. However, the best way to increase your max bodyweight pullups is to pick a weight that you can do 75% of your max bodyweight reps with. So if your max reps is 20 then add extra weight that will allow you to do 15 and from there try to increase your weighted pullup reps by 1 every workout, till you get to 20. After that, test your max bodyweight reps, and then repeat the process.

Weighted pullups are great and a good change of pace from bodyweight pullups. By adding weighted pullups into your workouts you will build more strength and see an increase in your bodyweight pullups in no time.








Steve Proto
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