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 How long do you need to rest?

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Drego75



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PostSubject: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 09, 2011 7:16 pm

ok, i know this question was already asked..how many times a week do ya'll workout..and the consensus was that ya'll workout about everyday give or take. But do yall do upper body every day? I mean you never get any rest to grow and get stronger. Or do yall do upper.lower.upper.lower.upper and rest on weekends? I just want to know how many times yall do UPPER body..not necessarily workout, just do upper body.

btw, i have been working out for years but i am a newbie with calisthenics. i tried the whole bodybuilding thing with isolation's and stuff but calisthenics is way better and way more functional.
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1stratos1

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 09, 2011 7:26 pm

Well drego i m also newbie to calisthetics (hmm almost 3 months) but cause i want to train whole body when i workout i used to workout twice per week, and maybe once a week do some extra cardio.

After i saw some goods of the HIT i started doing about twice hit instead of once cardio. But i really felled some different about how tired i was when i was doing my main one.

Recently i started doing jump rope and cause i loved it i used to do almost 4-5 days per week jump rope and after some more exercises for upper body and maybe some squats.

SO in conclusion when i started doing more frequently i felt more tired but i think im starting getting used to it.

Anyway i read somewhere in the forum that cause most ppl here are interested in strength and not in muscle mass u dont need to rest as many ppl from bodybuilding says cause this rest time is for muscle to get bigger, something like that. So as u feel fresh and ok to workout u can workout Razz


I hope i helped , but this question is really hmm depended from ppl to ppl
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Drego75



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 09, 2011 7:42 pm

yeah i guess it does depend from person to person. yeah im looking more for strength so if i feel good im going to workout. thanks
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Tim

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 09, 2011 7:52 pm

When I started I was training 4 out of 7 days,

now i train everyday unless i'm absolutely screwed or severely ill Very Happy

As a bare minimum though i try to do a superset of
50 dips 30 pulls 60 presses 10 close grip pulls

However the intensity of each day varies according to how i'm feeling overall, and what i've done that day...

for example, today i did a version of the above set in the morning, 2.5 hours of ultimate frisbee training this afternoon which completely drained me, and then in the evening i've done 100+ pulls and 100+ presses nice and relaxed - this is pretty much what a rest day is for me... i just can't stay off the bar Wink


I never specifically train my lower body either (UF training and cycling covers it for me Smile )
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CristobalSanchez1992

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:12 am

i think you can train everyday, your body can adapt and resist.
in my case i just need only 10 hours of rest.
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raja



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 10:22 am

It varies. If you can recover from a workout daily, then go ahead. But schedule conflicts, lack of recovery, etc. can be a problem for some people. If the intensity is high, then you shouldn't be doing it every day. For example, you couldn't possibly train for a one arm chin up everyday. If you did, you'd develop tendinitis VERY quickly. Ease into volume and slowly add more sets/reps/intensity.
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pulldoggpull

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:44 am

it also depends how u structure ur days. u can easy train everyday. but if u trainin every day all out on the same muscle group of course u will be tired or wont be able to progress much. u can do 1 day whole body 1 day static hold, u can do 1 day upper body 1 day lower body. u can do 1 day upper body 1 day lower body 1 day cardio. it is easy to work out every day, just get some stuff settled out and u will be fine. the body adapts quick to it. for 1-2 weeks u will feel more tired when working out almost every or everyday but then u will be just fine! dont worry! make sure u warum up good before every workout and do stretch a lot! during + after workouts, in general stretch! this helps!

-alex
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Tim

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:47 am

pulldoggpull wrote:
it also depends how u structure ur days. u can easy train everyday. but if u trainin every day all out on the same muscle group of course u will be tired or wont be able to progress much. u can do 1 day whole body 1 day static hold, u can do 1 day upper body 1 day lower body. u can do 1 day upper body 1 day lower body 1 day cardio. it is easy to work out every day, just get some stuff settled out and u will be fine. the body adapts quick to it. for 1-2 weeks u will feel more tired when working out almost every or everyday but then u will be just fine! dont worry! make sure u warum up good before every workout and do stretch a lot! during + after workouts, in general stretch! this helps!

-alex
+1,

Also make sure you get plenty of good quality sleep too Smile
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raja



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 6:22 pm

One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.
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Vladimir

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Thu Feb 10, 2011 10:34 pm

raja wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.

I heard that it's exactly the opposite...calisthenics puts less stress on your joints than weight lifting.
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Daniel

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:12 am

Vladimir wrote:
raja wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.

I heard that it's exactly the opposite...calisthenics puts less stress on your joints than weight lifting.

That really depends on the exercise.
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pulldoggpull

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:21 pm

raja wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.

hmm sry raja bro but i must also kinda disagree here :/

it depends mostly on exercises.

one thing that i am sure of though is that more ppl that do weightlifting injure themselves quicker than those who do calistenics.

i say that simple on experience among me and my friends and that i have been around gyms etc.

especially on bench press and stuff like this. ppl simply rush into increasing weight too quick, do big time negative reps with spotters that they normally could not do etc.

in general calistenix if less hard on joints actually. no matter what we say. natural movements are used in the way that the body can take it. most people use full ROM. so many movements and machines are so bad on ur joints PURELY the movement of performing them is bad. whereas in calistenix u simply can rotate or shoulder or wrist or elbow better and there is no machine or bar or whatsoever to limit you to do the movement.

P.S. no hate against weightlifters btw.
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raja



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:20 pm

pulldoggpull wrote:
raja wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.

hmm sry raja bro but i must also kinda disagree here :/

it depends mostly on exercises.

one thing that i am sure of though is that more ppl that do weightlifting injure themselves quicker than those who do calistenics.

i say that simple on experience among me and my friends and that i have been around gyms etc.

especially on bench press and stuff like this. ppl simply rush into increasing weight too quick, do big time negative reps with spotters that they normally could not do etc.

in general calistenix if less hard on joints actually. no matter what we say. natural movements are used in the way that the body can take it. most people use full ROM. so many movements and machines are so bad on ur joints PURELY the movement of performing them is bad. whereas in calistenix u simply can rotate or shoulder or wrist or elbow better and there is no machine or bar or whatsoever to limit you to do the movement.

P.S. no hate against weightlifters btw.

I disagree. If an out of shape individual tries to get into a handstand and tries this for 10 minutes on the first day without any joint prep, their joints will be screaming soon after. If the same person were to load up the bench press with a weight they couldn't handle, the worst that would happen is the spotter would have to rerack the weight.

Calisthenics are better for joint prep because of the fact that they're harder on the joints. Planche training strengthens the joints, nervous system, and muscles to allow the individual to attain the skill. If you're overzealous, you will get hurt. But the added stress on the joints forces them to adapt and grow stronger. Joints get significantly less blood flow than muscle. If you can add an extra rep in a difficult move, you muscles have adapted. But your joints may not have adapted yet. This can cause injury. It may not apparent at first, but over time, if the overzealous behavior continues, the trainee will become injured. You have to strengthen the connective tissue in order to obtain an iron cross, back lever, planche, etc.

You can argue all day that weightlifting or calisthenics are natural or unnatural movements. You don't see hunter-gatherers hold handstands. You see them press heavy loads(rocks and the like). Does it mean the handstand is useless? No. It builds upper body strength, balance, joint integrity, etc. A planche is not a natural position for someone to get in. It's the most inefficient way to hold yourself up. But it's valuable. As are weights and other training tools such as calisthenics.
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1stratos1

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:39 pm

raja u told about some exercises thats really hard on joints. Ofc everything is have if u are not ready for it (for example muscle up). But if u go slowly without being impatient (too difficult xD) then u wont have any problem i guess as ur joints will also adapt.

Ofc the same goes for machines etc if u have someone trainer etc that tells u exactly what to do and its near u all the time as spotter then u ll be ok but if u just put much weight in a machine to show off then u can easily hurt urself. Ofc doing something bad for ur health just to show off is stupid but i m just taking something extreme to make u understand my point.

So if u go in both slowly then i guess its ok but i think basic moves is better for joints than machines. Just my though.

Something last that i want to point is that if a newbie 160kg try to do push ups maybe he got some joint problems cause he is too weighted so he maybe start from knees but in machines the weight its not a problem as u can choose what u want to lift.
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pulldoggpull

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:25 am

raja wrote:
pulldoggpull wrote:
raja wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned: bodyweight training is tougher on your joints and connective tissue than traditional weight lifting. Going too hard, too soon is a great way to get really injured. Take your time when you add add reps or intensity. Don't go to failure every set.

hmm sry raja bro but i must also kinda disagree here :/

it depends mostly on exercises.

one thing that i am sure of though is that more ppl that do weightlifting injure themselves quicker than those who do calistenics.

i say that simple on experience among me and my friends and that i have been around gyms etc.

especially on bench press and stuff like this. ppl simply rush into increasing weight too quick, do big time negative reps with spotters that they normally could not do etc.

in general calistenix if less hard on joints actually. no matter what we say. natural movements are used in the way that the body can take it. most people use full ROM. so many movements and machines are so bad on ur joints PURELY the movement of performing them is bad. whereas in calistenix u simply can rotate or shoulder or wrist or elbow better and there is no machine or bar or whatsoever to limit you to do the movement.

P.S. no hate against weightlifters btw.

I disagree. If an out of shape individual tries to get into a handstand and tries this for 10 minutes on the first day without any joint prep, their joints will be screaming soon after. If the same person were to load up the bench press with a weight they couldn't handle, the worst that would happen is the spotter would have to rerack the weight.

Calisthenics are better for joint prep because of the fact that they're harder on the joints. Planche training strengthens the joints, nervous system, and muscles to allow the individual to attain the skill. If you're overzealous, you will get hurt. But the added stress on the joints forces them to adapt and grow stronger. Joints get significantly less blood flow than muscle. If you can add an extra rep in a difficult move, you muscles have adapted. But your joints may not have adapted yet. This can cause injury. It may not apparent at first, but over time, if the overzealous behavior continues, the trainee will become injured. You have to strengthen the connective tissue in order to obtain an iron cross, back lever, planche, etc.

You can argue all day that weightlifting or calisthenics are natural or unnatural movements. You don't see hunter-gatherers hold handstands. You see them press heavy loads(rocks and the like). Does it mean the handstand is useless? No. It builds upper body strength, balance, joint integrity, etc. A planche is not a natural position for someone to get in. It's the most inefficient way to hold yourself up. But it's valuable. As are weights and other training tools such as calisthenics.

how realisticly is it that a out of shape individual does a total of 10 minutes of handstand on its first day?? considering also that a handstand hold doesnt to much to get into shape. an out of shape invididual would start with basics + their variations + cardio. this is the most likely to happen. and maybe dream of achieving moves like the planche or front lever or so cuz they saw some barbarian vids.

both can harm u. but i think considering the amount of ppl doing weights vs ppl doing calistenix + the way gyms and machines are designed and the way ppl train in/with them. that injuries are quite more common in the weight world than in the calistenix world.
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pulldoggpull

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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:37 am

1stratos1 wrote:
raja u told about some exercises thats really hard on joints. Ofc everything is have if u are not ready for it (for example muscle up). But if u go slowly without being impatient (too difficult xD) then u wont have any problem i guess as ur joints will also adapt.

Ofc the same goes for machines etc if u have someone trainer etc that tells u exactly what to do and its near u all the time as spotter then u ll be ok but if u just put much weight in a machine to show off then u can easily hurt urself. Ofc doing something bad for ur health just to show off is stupid but i m just taking something extreme to make u understand my point.

So if u go in both slowly then i guess its ok but i think basic moves is better for joints than machines. Just my though.

Something last that i want to point is that if a newbie 160kg try to do push ups maybe he got some joint problems cause he is too weighted so he maybe start from knees but in machines the weight its not a problem as u can choose what u want to lift.

lol u giving example of a 160kg newbie? take the average person who trains and make ur point :S

but ok lets go with ur point. i agree lol. i am not saying that weights are not beneficial etc. i just think that machines + weights have a higher chance of injury that calistenix. one of the reason just as u said, because at the machine np u can decide what u wanna lift. wanna add kgs quick? no problem just put them on. u wanna work heavy on the abs machine? or go for heavy overhead press or dumbell curls for biceps? no problem. but then u see these people being on machines and weights and isolating muscles and working them. do a push up and u work ur whole body and even more, balance, u work stabilizer muscles etc. do a bodyweight squat. if u dont have worked on it ur gonna lose balance and fall over, keep ur heels down etc. if u go to the gym and simply do it on a squat rack. u dont have to care about all that since ur stabilized by holding onto a bar. u can add more kg and simply compromise form, which means more stress on various parts of ur body which means higher injury or at least higher chance for injury. especially for the average out of shape joe or the 160kg individual. even though i still find it unrealisticly to say that this 160kg newbie will start squats etc :/
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paulalexanderbell



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:11 am

I think training strength needs more rest than training lactoendurance. so if your reps are high train all week but if not about 4 times a week or so. you have to listen to your body, if you feel drained don't train. also the amount of rest you need depends on your nutrition and sleep.
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Kvothe



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Wed Apr 06, 2011 2:41 pm

I can't really agree. I'm JUST starting my bodyweight training so I don't have much experience with calisthenics. However, I hurt my right elbow pretty badly doing powerlifting. I was doing pin presses from about an inch off my chest. I worked up to a 345 double and decided trying 365 would be a good idea. Not at all. Ever since that incident I've been dealing with significant tendonitis issues. I think bench press is probably the most overrated exercise you can do. There is very little carryover to the real world and the standing overhead press is far superior imo. But that neither here nor there.

With calisthenics there is some danger of irritation/imflammation due to overuse, but that is easily manageable since the rep range is so high. With powerlifting, you're doing lots of single, doubles, triples, etc., so the margin of error is much smaller. Listen to your body and you should be fine.
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raja



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Fri Apr 08, 2011 12:54 pm

Kvothe wrote:
I can't really agree. I'm JUST starting my bodyweight training so I don't have much experience with calisthenics. However, I hurt my right elbow pretty badly doing powerlifting. I was doing pin presses from about an inch off my chest. I worked up to a 345 double and decided trying 365 would be a good idea. Not at all. Ever since that incident I've been dealing with significant tendonitis issues. I think bench press is probably the most overrated exercise you can do. There is very little carryover to the real world and the standing overhead press is far superior imo. But that neither here nor there.

With calisthenics there is some danger of irritation/imflammation due to overuse, but that is easily manageable since the rep range is so high. With powerlifting, you're doing lots of single, doubles, triples, etc., so the margin of error is much smaller. Listen to your body and you should be fine.

You certainly can and should work in the lower rep range to achieve bodyweight strength moves. You don't train for a one arm chin up with high reps. Sure, high reps might help, but the majority of your training will involve low reps and high intensity. I see your point, but you can just as easily avoid the "dangers" of weight training by simply using a lighter weight and using higher reps as well.

Prehab, proper nutrition, and a level head are all useful in preventing injury.
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Kvothe



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Fri Apr 08, 2011 1:11 pm

raja wrote:
Kvothe wrote:
I can't really agree. I'm JUST starting my bodyweight training so I don't have much experience with calisthenics. However, I hurt my right elbow pretty badly doing powerlifting. I was doing pin presses from about an inch off my chest. I worked up to a 345 double and decided trying 365 would be a good idea. Not at all. Ever since that incident I've been dealing with significant tendonitis issues. I think bench press is probably the most overrated exercise you can do. There is very little carryover to the real world and the standing overhead press is far superior imo. But that neither here nor there.

With calisthenics there is some danger of irritation/imflammation due to overuse, but that is easily manageable since the rep range is so high. With powerlifting, you're doing lots of single, doubles, triples, etc., so the margin of error is much smaller. Listen to your body and you should be fine.



You certainly can and should work in the lower rep range to achieve bodyweight strength moves. You don't train for a one arm chin up with high reps. Sure, high reps might help, but the majority of your training will involve low reps and high intensity. I see your point, but you can just as easily avoid the "dangers" of weight training by simply using a lighter weight and using higher reps as well.

Prehab, proper nutrition, and a level head are all useful in preventing injury.

Bodyweight training typically requires muscle endurance than weight training. I can do dips with a 100lb db chained to my waist for 8 reps, but can only do 27 dips with just my bodyweight. My muscle fiber type is obviously leaning more towards fast twitch.

I'm also not saying that weight training can't be done safely, it surely can, I'm just saying that most bodyweight exercises are inherently safer.
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Kvothe



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PostSubject: Re: How long do you need to rest?   Fri Apr 08, 2011 3:54 pm

Although interesting enough, I just ran the formula Christian Thibadeau uses for determining 1rm (which is weight used x reps x .0333 + weight used). If you went by my bodyweight, which is 205 and used the number of reps I did, 27, it says my 1rm is 389. I also ran it using 100lbs added and 8 reps and got 386. So maybe I am within the normal range.

These formulas aren't perfect, but they seem to give you an idea at least.
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